The blog of Windows Wally, a Windows Support Technician helping common people solve frustrating computer problems.



How To Stop Windows 10 From Using-up Internet Volume

Reader Question:
“Hi Wally, Today I looked at my internet company’s website and found out that I had been consuming 30 gigabytes of volume in 4 days. From what I can tell, I should not have used this much. I think Windows 10 is downloading upgrades in the background and draining the volume. How do I turn it off? Thank You“ - M. Ali., USA

Before addressing any computer issue, I always recommend scanning and repairing any underlying problems affecting your PC health and performance:

  • Step 1 : Download PC Repair & Optimizer Tool (WinThruster for Win7, XP, Vista – Microsoft Gold Certified).
  • Step 2 : Click “Start Scan” to find Windows registry issues that could be causing PC problems.
  • Step 3 : Click “Repair All” to fix all issues.

Setting up weekly (or daily) automatic scans will help prevent system problems and keep your PC running fast and trouble-free.

Wally’s Answer: Windows 10 came with a few surprises for everyone. While most of them were positive, there were some features that people did not like. The biggest one is probably Microsoft’s decision to make all automatic updates permanent while taking away the ability to turn them off, and re-starting the computer to install updates automatically. Here, we will tell you how to take back control of your internet connection on a volume based connection.

Problem

Windows 10 is downloading updates automatically and using up my internet volume. How do I prevent updates from installing automatically on a volume based internet connection?

Solution

There is a way to set your internet connection as a metered connection. This tells Windows that it should not use bandwidth freely. Here’s how to do it:

Avoid Automatic Downloads of Updates by Setting Your Internet Connection as a Metered Connection

Windows 10 is set to download updates by default unless you’re using a metered connection. Windows will automatically set a mobile internet connection as a metered connection, but a wifi connection is set as an unlimited internet connection by default.

Luckily, you can easily change this setting to a metered connection. Windows will remember this setting every time you connect to the same wifi/ethernet connection unless you change its name or reset your router’s settings. In that case you’ll have to set this option again since Windows will treat it like a new wifi connection.

  1. Press the Windows Key and type wifi > click Change Wi-Fi settings from the list of search results.
    Volume - Windows 10 - Change Wi-Fi settings - Windows Wally
  2. Click Wi-Fi from the left side of the screen > choose your internet connection from the list > click the Advanced options link from the bottom.
    Volume - Windows 10 - Change Wi-Fi settings - 2 - Windows Wally
  3. Here you should see the Metered Connection heading and some detail. Click the button under Set as metered connection to turn this feature on. It should look something like this when turned on.
    Volume - Windows 10 - Change Wi-Fi settings - 3 - Windows Wally

This should stop Windows 10 from using your internet volume. If you have any more questions about Windows 10 and internet related issues then please ask us in the comments section below. Hope this helped :)

Is Your PC Healthy?

I always recommend to my readers to regularly use a trusted registry cleaner and optimizer such as WinThruster or CCleaner. Many problems that you encounter can be attributed to a corrupt and bloated registry.

Happy Computing! :)

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About the Author

Windows Wally is a helpful guy. It’s just in his nature. It’s why he started a blog in the first place. He heard over and over how hard it was to find simple, plain-English solutions to Windows troubleshooting problems on the Internet. Enter: Windows Wally. Ask away, and he will answer.